The Joy of Hope Ness

Hope Ness is a special place, a sacred place. There is a spirit here, perhaps of those who since time immemorial came here for spiritual and physical rejuvenation — for healing. She who lived here so many years before me, planted and tended her gardens, raised her boys, and did the best she could to do it justice. She spoke respectfully of First Nation people she saw walking these woods in search of nourishment. She walked beneath the canopy of trees, the “Cathedral” she called it, to the lookout, her favourite place. She looked out across the bay and felt the sacred presence beneath her feet. She held it close to her heart. It sustained her too, gave her moments of joy, restored her spirit. Oh, what I would give to be timeless, to be with her in that moment. She found Hope Ness the day she was born here and never wanted to leave. She was worthy of it. I, who came from another place, am still searching for Hope Ness, still finding it. Maybe I will go into the forest and find my special place finally, among the trees and the wild friends who live there.

Among my friends in the buckwheat, and the milkweed too

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Listen, and you might just hear the bees

In the morning I take some time to stand amid the buckwheat, fully in bloom now, and listen to the murmur of countless bees and other insect pollinators. The bumblebees seem to be most prevalent, certainly most visible. Where they go when they’re not hear gathering nectar from dense proliferation of white, buckwheat flowers, I don’t know. I let them be, no pun intended, but I think a lot about the great danger posed to them and their buzzing friends by the widespread use of the most recent type of human-made pesticides, neonicotinoids, or neonics for short. Continue reading

Conservative politicians in Canada are playing a dangerous game pushing the populist anti-migrant hot button

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To those fleeing persecution, terror & war, Canadians will welcome you, regardless of your faith. Diversity is our strength.

-Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s twitter message, January, 2017

There it is. That’s what the fuss is all about, the entire reason why, according to Conservative politicians in Toronto and Ottawa, Canada is in the midst of a “migrant crisis,” or more succinctly, in a “mess.”

Words are important, especially hyperactive words like that, with hateful, anti-migrant, populist/political movements coming to power in the U.S. and Europe while millions of displaced people are risking their lives to find a safe haven, or barely surviving in squalid refugee camps. Continue reading

On drought, and the reign of what’s best about being human

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An RCMP officer with a big heart welcomes a migrant/refugee child to Canada last winter at an unofficial border crossing. Who can say this is wrong?

A few days of occasional, light showers, amounting to a scant 2.2 millimetres of rain is not yet enough to end the extended drought the Bruce Peninsula has been experiencing through the most critical period of the current growing season. But it’s better than nothing when your field crops and vegetables are in dire need of any amount of moisture they can get.  Continue reading

A Toronto tragedy put to rest

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Canadian soldiers destined for war march past Casa Loma in 1914

We took Mom’s ashes back to Toronto a few days ago, to Westminster Cemetery, to be buried with her birth mother Clara, her beloved aunts/sisters Bella and Lila, and her grandparents/adoptive parents, Thomas and Eliza, in the Thompson family burial site.

Our hope was they would all be put to rest and joined together in spirit at last. And if that finally is the purpose of my life, to facilitate a final spiritual resolution to the turmoil and unhappiness of their lives, to give them closure, then I am content. Continue reading

Elephants in the room, Trump, Trans Mountain, and the future of Canada

Trump welcomes Canada's Trudeau before their about the NAFTA trade agreement at the White House in Washington

October, 11, 2017 U.S. Donald Trump meets Canada’s Prime Minister Justin Trudeau at the White House. Interesting hand gesture, in retrospect. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

There’s an “elephant in the room” regarding the Government of Canada’s controversial decision to buy the Trans Mountain pipelines, existing and planned, from Kinder Morgan Canada, a subsidiary of a much bigger company based in Texas, for $4.5 Billion.

And its name is Donald Trump.

Continue reading